Welcome to CDC Stacks | Skin cancer prevention progress report 2015 - 32535 | Stephen B. Thacker CDC Library collection
Stacks Logo
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
Help
Clear All Simple Search
Advanced Search
Skin cancer prevention progress report 2015
  • Published Date:
    07/01/2015
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF - 7.55 MB]


This document cannot be previewed automatically as it exceeds 5 MB
Please click the thumbnail image to view the document.
Skin cancer prevention progress report 2015
Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (U.S.). Division of Cancer Prevention and Control.
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    Background -- What’s new this year? -- Success stories from the field -- Outcome indicators -- Conclusion -- References.

    Skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States, yet most cases are preventable. Every year in the United States, nearly 5 million people are treated for skin cancer, at an estimated cost of $8.1 billion. Melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, causes more than 9,000 deaths each year.2= Unlike many other cancers, skin cancer rates have continued to rise in recent years.

    As a public health community, we are taking concrete steps to address this serious public health problem. In July 2014, the Office of the Surgeon General released The Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Prevent Skin Cancer (Call to Action), establishing skin cancer prevention as a high priority for our nation. The Call to Action described prevention strategies that work and called on all community sectors to play a role in protecting Americans from ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun and artificial sources, such as indoor tanning devices (Table 1).

    The federal government and its partners in skin cancer prevention across the United States have made important progress, but much work remains. This is the inaugural edition of the Skin Cancer Prevention Progress Report, which will summarize recent prevention efforts and highlight new data, developments, and success stories following the Call to Action. By updating this report annually, we can monitor progress, celebrate and learn from successes, recognize areas that need improvement, and identify opportunities to work with partners in government, health care, education, business, and the community.

    Suggested citation: Skin Cancer Prevention Progress Report 2015. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US Dept of Health and Human Services; 2015.

    CS257240-A

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files