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Parental Practices and Attitudes Related to Smoke-Free Rules in Homes, Cars, and Outdoor Playgrounds in US Households With Underage Children and Smokers, 2010–2011
Filetype[PDF - 342.18 KB]


Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    26086609
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4473600
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    Introduction

    A smoke-free environment protects children from exposure to involuntary smoke and also can reduce or prevent future smoking behavior. The purpose of this study was to examine levels and correlates of parental behavior and attitudes related to voluntary smoke-free rules in homes, cars, and outdoor children’s play areas among US households with underage children and 1 or more smoking parents.

    Methods

    We used data from the 2010–2011 Tobacco Use Supplement to the Current Population Survey and logistic regressions to model behavior and attitudes related to voluntary smoke-free rules in 3 settings.

    Results

    Overall, 60.1% of households with children and at least 1 smoking parent had voluntary smoke-free home rules. Approximately 84.6% and 71.5% of parents thought that smoking should not be allowed inside cars with children present and in outdoor play areas, respectively. Positive parental behavior and attitudes related to voluntary smoke-free rules were more likely among households with 2 parents, parents of higher education and household income, Hispanic parents, and parents of infants (P < .05).

    Conclusion

    Tobacco control and prevention efforts are needed to promote the voluntary adoption of smoke-free rules in homes, private cars, and outdoor children’s play areas. Most parents from smoker households with underage children were supportive of smoke-free laws for cars and outdoor children’s play areas, providing evidence and encouragement to policy makers to take action to restrict smoking in these locations.