Protect all the skin you’re in
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Protect all the skin you’re in

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      Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States, yet most skin cancers can be prevented. Every year, there are 63,000 new cases of and 9,000 deaths from melanoma—the deadliest form of skin cancer. Ultraviolet (UV) exposure is the most common cause of skin cancer. A new CDC study shows that the majority of Americans are not using sunscreen regularly to protect themselves from the sun’s harmful UV rays. In fact, fewer than 15% of men and fewer than 30% of women reported using sunscreen regularly on their face and other exposed skin when outside for more than 1 hour. Many women report that they regularly use sunscreen on their faces but not on other exposed skin. Choose sun protection strategies that work: • Use broad spectrum sunscreen with SPF 15+ to protect any exposed skin. • Seek shade, especially during midday hours. • Wear a hat, sunglasses and other clothes to protect skin. Sunscreen works best when used with shade or clothes, and it must be re-applied every two hours and after swimming, sweating, and toweling off. CS255931
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