Welcome to CDC Stacks | CDC recommendations to the U.S. Army for protecting public health during chemical weapons elimination : Annual report, Fiscal Year 2010 - 31786 | Stephen B. Thacker CDC Library collection
Stacks Logo
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
Help
Clear All Simple Search
Advanced Search
CDC recommendations to the U.S. Army for protecting public health during chemical weapons elimination : Annual report, Fiscal Year 2010
  • Published Date:
    March 2011
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF - 641.11 KB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    National Center for Environmental Health (U.S.). Division of Emergency and Environmental Health Services. Environmental Public Health Readiness Branch.
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    The mission of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Environmental Public Health Readiness Branch is to protect public health and safety by providing guidance to the U.S. Army's chemical weapons demilitarization program. CDC conducts reviews and makes recommendations to the U.S. Army's plans to destroy stockpile and nonstockpile materials. These reviews are conducted during design, startup, and operations of the facilities and processes used by the U.S. Army for disposal.

    By the end of fiscal year (FY) 2010, the U.S. Army safely destroyed over 80% of the United States stockpile of chemical weapons and completed the disposal of all declared nonstockpile materials.

    During FY 2010, CDC made 129 recommendations to the U.S. Army. These recommendations involved air monitoring (42.6%), process safety (33.3%), site closure (10.1%), medical programs (7.8%), and industrial hygiene (6.2%). In FY 2010, the U.S. Army accepted 80.0% (N=64/80) of CDC recommendations made across all sites and areas of concern.

    CDC developed a method of classifying recommendations as either required (an action required to protect public health) or best practice (an action that would allow operation in a safer environment). Of the 27 required recommendations that had a documented U.S. Army response, 89.5% (N=34/38) were accepted. The remaining four recommendations were not accepted but the U.S. Army provided CDC with an acceptable alternative or justification.

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files