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Ambient polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and pulmonary function in children
  • Published Date:
    Jun 18 2014
  • Source:
    J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2014; 25(3):295-302.
Filetype[PDF - 428.41 KB]


Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    24938508
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4270934
  • Funding:
    5U19EH000097-04/EH/NCEH CDC HHS/United States
    K99 ES021470/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/United States
    K99ES021470/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/United States
    L40 ES023163/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/United States
    P01 ES022849/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/United States
    P01ES022849/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/United States
    P20 ES018173/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/United States
    P20 ES018173/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/United States
    R01 ES020926/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/United States
    R01 HL081521/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/United States
    R01 HL081521/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/United States
    R01ES020926/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Few studies have examined the relationship between ambient polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and pulmonary function in children. Major sources include vehicular emissions, home heating, wildland fires, agricultural burning, and power plants. PAHs are an important component of fine particulate matter that has been linked to respiratory health. This cross-sectional study examines the relationship between estimated individual exposures to the sum of PAHs with 4, 5, or 6 rings (PAH456) and pulmonary function tests (forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of vital capacity) in asthmatic and non-asthmatic children. We applied land-use regression to estimate individual exposures to ambient PAHs for averaging periods ranging from 1 week to 1 year. We used linear regression to estimate the relationship between exposure to PAH456 with pre- and postbronchodilator pulmonary function tests in children in Fresno, California (N=297). Among non-asthmatics, there was a statistically significant association between PAH456 during the previous 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year and postbronchodilator FEV1. The magnitude of the association increased with the length of the averaging period ranging from 60 to 110 ml decrease in FEV1 for each 1 ng/m(3) increase in PAH456. There were no associations with PAH456 observed among asthmatic children. We identified an association between annual PAHs and chronic pulmonary function in children without asthma. Additional studies are needed to further explore the association between exposure to PAHs and pulmonary function, especially with regard to differential effects between asthmatic and non-asthmatic children.