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Dengue and chikungunya in our backyard : preventing Aedes mosquito-borne disease
  • Published Date:
    May 19, 2015
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF-2.35 MB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.). Office of the Associate Director for Communication. ; National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) ;
  • Description:
    Dengue, chikungunya and other Aedes mosquito-borne diseases [PDF version of the PowerPoint presentation by Marc Fischer, p. 2-31] -- The Status and frontiers of vector control [PDF version of the PowerPoint presentation by Thomas W. Scott, p. 32-52] -- Prevention strategies for Aedes mosquito-borne disease [PDF version of the PowerPoint presentation by Harold S. Margolis, p. 53-70].

    Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes are the primary vectors for dengue, chikungunya, yellow fever, and Zika viruses. Taken together, these viruses account for almost 100 million cases of mosquito-borne disease per year. Globally, dengue is the most important mosquito-borne viral disease. In the last 50 years, incidence has increased 30-fold by expanding into new countries and new areas. Chikungunya often occurs in large outbreaks with high infection rates, affecting more than a third of the population in areas where the virus is circulating. In 2014, more than a million cases were reported worldwide. While Chikungunya disease rarely results in death, the symptoms can be severe and disabling.

    Outbreaks of mosquito-borne diseases depend on many factors and are especially difficult to predict, prevent and control. Because there are no licensed vaccines available to prevent dengue or chikungunya, controlling mosquito populations and reducing bites are currently the most effective prevention measures.

    This session of Grand Rounds will highlight the importance of preventing Aedes mosquito-borne diseases and the need for improved diagnostic, prevention and control measures.

    Tuesday, May 19 at 1 pm EDT.

    Presented by: Marc Fischer, MD, MPH, Chief, Surveillance and Epidemiology Activity, Arboviral Diseases Branch, Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, CDC ["Dengue, Chikungunya and Other Aedes Mosquito-Borne Diseases"]; Thomas W. Scott, PhD
Professor and Director, Vector-Borne Disease Laboratory, Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of California, Davis ["The Status and Frontiers of Vector Control"]; Harold Margolis, MD
Branch Chief, Dengue Branch, Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, CDC ["Prevention Strategies for Aedes Mosquito-Borne Diseases"]

    Facilitated by: John Iskander, MD, MPH, Scientific Director, Public Health Grand Rounds; Phoebe Thorpe, MD, MPH, Deputy Scientific Director, Public Health Grand Rounds; Susan Laird, MSN, RN, Communications Manager, Public Health Grand Rounds.

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