Welcome to CDC Stacks | Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) practices among adult infectious disease physicians - 30132 | CDC Public Access
Stacks Logo
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
Help
Clear All Simple Search
Advanced Search
Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) practices among adult infectious disease physicians
Filetype[PDF - 528.60 KB]


Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    24915212
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4180108
  • Description:
    Objective

    To identify current outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy practice patterns and complications.

    Methods

    We administered an 11 question survey to adult infectious disease physicians participating in the Emerging Infections Network (EIN), a CDC-sponsored sentinel event surveillance network in North America. The survey was distributed electronically or via facsimile in November and December 2012. Respondent demographic characteristics were obtained from EIN enrollment data.

    Results

    Overall, 555 (44.6%) of EIN members responded to the survey with 450 (81%) indicating they treated ≥ 1 patient with OPAT during an average month. ID consultation was reported to be required for a patient to be discharged on OPAT by 99 (22%) respondents. Inpatient (282/449; 63%) and outpatient (232/449; 52%) ID physicians were frequently identified as being responsible for monitoring lab results. Only 26% (118/448) had dedicated OPAT teams at their clinical site. Few ID physicians have systems to track errors, adverse events or “near-misses” associated with OPAT (97/449; 22%). OPAT complications were perceived to be rare. Among respondents, 80% reported line occlusion/clotting as the most common complication (occurring in ≥6% of patients), followed by nephrotoxicity and rash (each reported by 61%). Weekly lab monitoring of patients on vancomycin was reported by 77% (343/445) of respondents; whereas 19% (84/445) of respondents reported twice weekly lab monitoring for these patients.

    Conclusions

    Although utilization of OPAT is common, there is significant variation in practice patterns. More uniform OPAT practices may enhance patient safety.

  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Funding:
    1U50CK000187/CK/NCEZID CDC HHS/United States
    5K12HD001459-13/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/United States
    CU54 CK 000162/CK/NCEZID CDC HHS/United States
    KL2 TR000136/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/United States
    KL2 TR000450/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/United States
    KL2 TR000450/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/United States
    KL2RR024994/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/United States
    KM1CA156708/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
    L30 AR063363/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/United States
    L30 AR063363/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/United States
    UL1 RR024992/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/United States
    UL1 TR000448/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/United States
    UL1 TR000448/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/United States
    UL1RR024992/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/United States
No Related Documents.
You May Also Like: