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Emergency Department Predictors of Posttraumatic Stress Reduction for Trauma-Exposed Individuals With and Without an Early Intervention
  • Published Date:
    Feb 03 2014
  • Source:
    J Consult Clin Psychol. 2014; 82(2):336-341.
Filetype[PDF - 247.21 KB]


Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    24491070
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4161951
  • Description:
    Objective

    Recent data have supported the use of an early exposure intervention to promote a reduction in acute stress and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms after trauma exposure. The present study explored a comprehensive predictive model that included history of trauma exposure, dissociation at the time of the trauma and early intervention, and physiological responses (cortisol and heart rate) to determine which variables were most indicative of reduced PTSD symptoms for an early intervention or treatment as usual.

    Method

    Participants (n = 137) were randomly assigned to the early intervention condition (n = 68) or assessment-only condition (n = 69) while receiving care at the emergency department of a Level 1 trauma center. Follow-up assessments occurred at 4 and 12 weeks posttrauma.

    Results

    Findings suggested that dissociation at the time of the 1st treatment session was associated with reduced response to the early intervention. No other predictors were associated with treatment response. For treatment as usual, cortisol levels at the time of acute care and dissociation at the time of the traumatic event were positively associated with PTSD symptoms.

    Conclusions

    Dissociation at the time at which treatment starts may indicate poorer response to early intervention for PTSD. Similarly, dissociation at the time of the event was positively related to PTSD symptoms in those who received treatment as usual.

  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Funding:
    5R49CE001494/CE/NCIPC CDC HHS/United States
    R34 MH083078/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/United States
    R34MH083078/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/United States
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