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Changing the Culture of Academic Medicine to Eliminate the Gender Leadership Gap: 50/50 by 2020
Filetype[PDF - 50.82 KB]


Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    23969359
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC3785938
  • Funding:
    1DP4GM096849-01/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
    1UL1RR025744-01/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/United States
    DP4 GM096849/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Description:
    Central to the daily struggles that successful working women face is the misalignment of the current work culture and the values of the workforce. In addition to contributing to work-life integration conflicts, this disconnect perpetuates the gender leadership gap. The dearth of women at the highest ranks of academic medicine not only sends a clear message to women that they must choose between career advancement and their personal life but also represents a loss of talent for academic health centers as they fail to recruit and retain the best and the brightest. To close the gender leadership gap and to meet the needs of the next generation of physicians, scientists, and educators, the authors argue that the culture of academic medicine must change to one in which flexibility and work-life integration are core parts of the definition of success. Faculty must see flexibility policies, such as tenure clock extensions and parental leaves, as career advancing rather than career limiting. To achieve these goals, the authors describe the Stanford University School of Medicine Academic Biomedical Career Customization (ABCC) model. This framework includes individualized career plans, which span a faculty member's career, with options to flex up or down in research, patient care, administration, and teaching, and mentoring discussions, which ensure that faculty take full advantage of the existing policies designed to make career customization possible. The authors argue that with vision, determination, and focus, the academic medicine community can eliminate the gender leadership gap to achieve 50/50 by 2020.