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Preventing teen pregnancy : a key role for health care providers
  • Published Date:
    April 7, 2015
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF - 2.90 MB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (U.S.). Division of Reproductive Health.
  • Series:
    CDC Vital signs ; 2015 April
  • Description:
    Teen childbearing can carry health, economic, and social costs for mothers and their children. Teen births in the US have declined, but still more than 273,000 infants were born to teens ages 15 to 19 in 2013. The good news is that more teens are waiting to have sex, and for sexually active teens, nearly 90% used birth control the last time they had sex. However, teens most often use condoms and birth control pills, which are less effective at preventing pregnancy when not used consistently and correctly. Intrauterine devices (IUDs) and implants, known as Long-Acting Reversible Contraception (LARC), are the most effective types of birth control for teens. LARC is safe to use, does not require taking a pill each day or doing something each time before having sex, and can prevent pregnancy for 3 to 10 years, depending on the method. Less than 1% of LARC users would become pregnant during the first year of use.

    Doctors, nurses, and other health care providers can:

    ◊ Encourage teens not to have sex.

    ◊ Recognize LARC as a safe and effective choice of birth control for teens.

    ◊ Offer a broad range of birth control options to teens, including LARC, and discuss the pros and cons of each.

    ◊ Seek training in LARC insertion and removal, have supplies of LARC available, and explore funding options to cover costs.

    ◊ Remind teens that LARC by itself does not protect against sexually transmitted diseases and that condoms should also be used every time they have sex.

    CS254991-A

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files