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Making healthcare safer : stopping C. difficile infections
  • Published Date:
    March 6, 2012
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF - 1.81 MB]


Details:
  • Series:
    CDC Vital signs ; 2012 March
  • Description:
    Introduction -- Problem -- Who's at risk? -- What can be done -- Science behind this issue -- Related links -- Social media -- Read associated MMWR.

    People getting medical care can catch serious infections called health care-associated infections (HAIs). While most types of HAIs are declining, one -- caused by the germ C. difficile -- remains at historically high levels. C. difficile causes diarrhea linked to 14,000 American deaths each year. Those most at risk are people, especially older adults, who take antibiotics and also get medical care. When a person takes antibiotics, good germs that protect against infection are destroyed for several months. During this time, patients can get sick from C. difficile picked up from contaminated surfaces or spread from a health care provider's hands. About 25% of C. difficile infections first show symptoms in hospital patients; 75% first show in nursing home patients or in people recently cared for in doctors' offices and clinics. C. difficile infections cost at least $1 billion in extra health care costs annually.

    Fact sheet released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Office of Surveillance, Epidemiology and Laboratory Services (OSELS) in association with: Vital signs: Preventing Clostridium difficile infections: MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report ; v. 61, early release, March 6, 2012, p. 1-6.

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files