Trends in the Use, Sociodemographic Correlates, and Undertreatment of Prescription Medications for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease among Adults with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in the United States from 1999 to 2010
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Trends in the Use, Sociodemographic Correlates, and Undertreatment of Prescription Medications for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease among Adults with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in the United States from 1999 to 2010

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  • Alternative Title:
    PLoS One
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    Background The extent to which patients with COPD are receiving indicated treatment with medications to improve lung function and recent trends in the use of these medications is not well documented in the United States. The objective of this study was to examine trends in prescription medications for COPD among adults in the United States from 1999 to 2010. Methods We performed a trend analysis using data from up to 1426 participants aged ≥20 years with self-reported COPD from six national surveys (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2010). Results During 2009–2010, the age-adjusted percentage of participants who used any kind of medication was 44.2%. Also during 2009–2010, the most commonly used medications were short-acting agents (36.0%), inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) (18.3%), and LABAs (16.7%). The use of long-acting beta-2 agonists (LABAs) (p for trend <0.001), ICS (p for trend = 0.013) increased significantly over the 12-year period. Furthermore, the use of tiotropium increased rapidly during this period (p for trend <0.001). For the years 2005–2010, the use of LABAs, ICS and tiotropium increased with age. Compared with whites, Mexican Americans were less likely to use short-acting agents, LABAs, ICS, tiotropium, and any kind of COPD medication. Among participants aged 20–79 years with spirometry measurements during 2007–2010, the use of any medication was reported by 19.0% of those with a moderate/severe obstructive impairment and by 72.6% of those with self-reported COPD and any obstructive impairment. Conclusion The percentages of adults with COPD who reported having various classes of prescription medications that improve airflow limitations changed markedly from 1999–2000 to 2009–2010. However, many adults with COPD did not report having recommended prescription medications.
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