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Lead screening during the domestic medical examination for newly arrived refugees
  • Published Date:
    September 18, 2013
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF - 443.27 KB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (U.S.). Division of Global Migration and Quarantine.
  • Description:
    Background -- Clinical Presentation -- Evaluation and Treatment of Persons with Elevated Blood Levels -- Recommendations for Post-Arrival Lead Screening -- Sources of Additional Information – References.

    Following the phasing out of leaded gasoline and the ban on lead-based paint, the prevalence of lead poisoning, previously defined as a blood lead level (BLL) ≥ 10 mcg/dL, among children in the United States, has dramatically declined since the 1970s-- decreasing from 78% from 1976-1980 to 1.6% from 1996-2002.1 In contrast, refugee children arriving in the United States in recent years have increased average rates of BLL at their time of arrival.

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files