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Understanding the causes of major birth defects : steps to prevention
  • Published Date:
    January 20, 2015
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF - 3.10 MB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.). Office of the Associate Director for Communication. ; National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (U.S.). Division of Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities. Birth Defects Branch. ;
  • Series:
    Public health grand rounds ; 2015 January 20
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    The impact of birth defects and current understanding of their causes [PDF version of the PowerPoint presentation by Marcia L. Feldkamp, p. 2-16] -- Advancing understanding of the causes of birth defects [PDF version of the PowerPoint presentation by Jennita Reefhuis ,p. 17-32] -- Birth defects research and emergency preparedness: the Vaccines and Medications in Pregnancy Surveillance System [PDF version of the PowerPoint presentation by Allen A. Mitchell, p. 33-52] -- Identifying what else we can do to prevent birth defects [PDF version of the PowerPoint presentation by Suzanne Gilboa, p. 53-70].

    Birth defects are serious conditions that involve changes to the structure of one or more parts of the body. While the causes of many birth defects are still unknown, their importance and the impact on peoples’ lives are quite clear. Birth defects are common, occurring in 1 of every 33 babies born every year in the United States. Depending on the severity of the defect, the expected lifespan of a person with a birth defect can be greatly reduced. In 2011, of the 24,000 infants that died in their first year of life, 4,800 succumbed due to a birth defect. Additionally, birth defects are a leading cause of pediatric hospitalizations and medical expenditures. It is estimated that 2.6 billion US dollars are spent annually in caring for infants, children, and adults living with a birth defect.

    CDC and its partners are working together to identify both genetic and environmental risk factors that may contribute to the development of birth defects. Folic acid fortification has been a major success in the prevention of some types of birth defects and there is ongoing research on the impact of interventions that target obesity, smoking, and diabetes. We have made great advances, but there is still much that can be done to understand and prevent birth defects.

    Tuesday, January 20, 2015 at 1pm EST.

    Presented by: Marcia L. Feldkamp, PhD, PA, Associate Professor, Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah [“The Impact of Birth Defects and Current Understanding of their Causes”]; Jennita Reefhuis, PhD, Epidemiology Team Lead, Birth Defects Branch

    Division of Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, CDC [“Advancing Understanding of the Causes of Birth Defects”]; Allen A. Mitchell, MD, Director, Slone Epidemiology Center and Professor of Epidemiology and Pediatrics, Boston University Schools of Public Health and Medicine [“Birth Defects Research and Emergency Preparedness: The Vaccines and Medications in Pregnancy Surveillance System”]; Suzanne Gilboa, PhD, MHS, Partnerships and Applied Epidemiology Team Lead, Birth Defects Branch, Division of Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, CDC [“Identifying What Else We Can Do To Prevent Birth Defects”].

    Facilitated by: John Iskander, MD, MPH, Scientific Director, Public Health Grand Rounds; Phoebe Thorpe, MD, MPH, Deputy Scientific Director, Public Health Grand Rounds; Susan Laird, MSN, RN, Communications Manager, Public Health Grand Rounds.

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files