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Blood Glucose Screening Rates Among Minnesota Adults With Hypertension, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2011
  • Published Date:
    Nov 26 2014
  • Source:
    Prev Chronic Dis. 11.
Filetype[PDF - 412.75 KB]


Details:
  • Pubmed ID:
    25427315
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC4247121
  • Funding:
    1U58DP001974-01/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
    1U58DP004815-01/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS/United States
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    Introduction

    Many US adults have multiple chronic conditions, and hypertension and diabetes are among the most common dyads. Diabetes and prediabetes prevalence are increasing, and both conditions negatively affect cardiovascular health. Early diagnosis and treatment of diabetes and prediabetes can benefit people with hypertension by preventing cardiovascular complications.

    Methods

    We analyzed 2011 Minnesota Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data to describe the proportion of adults with hypertension screened for diabetes according to US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendations for blood glucose testing. Covariates associated with lower odds of recent screening among adults without diabetes were determined using weighted logistic regression.

    Results

    Of Minnesota adults with self-reported hypertension, 19.6% had a diagnosis of diabetes and 10.7% had a diagnosis of prediabetes. Nearly one-third of adults with hypertension without diabetes had not received blood glucose screening in the past 3 years. Factors associated with greater odds of not being screened in multivariable models included being aged 18 to 44 years (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23–2.55); being nonobese, with stronger effects for normal body mass index; having no check-up in the past 2 years (AOR, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.49–4.17); having hypertension treated with medication (AOR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.49–2.71); and completing less than a college degree (AOR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.14–1.84). Excluding respondents with prediabetes or those not receiving a check-up did not change the results.

    Conclusions

    Failure to screen among providers and failure to understand the importance of screening among individuals with hypertension may mean missed opportunities for early detection, clinical management, and prevention of diabetes.