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Toxoplasmosis : an important message for cat owners
  • Published Date:
    2/9/12
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF - 1.56 MB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    Center for Global Health (U.S.). Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria
  • Description:
    What role do cats play in the spread of toxoplasmosis? -- What is toxoplasmosis? -- How are people infected with Toxoplasma? -- What are the symptoms of toxoplasmosis? -- How can I protect myself from toxoplasmosis? -- How can I protect my cat from toxoplasmosis? -- Do I have to get rid of my cat? -- Can toxoplasmosis be treated?

    Cats get Toxoplasma infection by eating infected rodents, birds or other small animals, or anything contaminated with feces from another cat that is shedding the microscopic parasite in its feces. After a cat has been infected, it can shed the parasite for up to two weeks. The parasite becomes infective one to five days after it is passed in the feces of the cat. The parasite can live in the environment for many months and contaminate soil, water, fruits and vegetables, sandboxes, grass where animals graze for food, litter boxes, or any place where an infected cat may have defecated.

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files