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CDC influenza surveillance report no. 37, March 11, 1958
  • Published Date:
    March 11, 1958
Filetype[PDF - 1.72 MB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    Communicable Disease Center (U.S.), Influenza Surveillance Unit.
  • Series:
    CDC influenza surveillance report ; no. 37
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    I. Summary of information -- II. Current analysis of influenza and pneumonia mortality -- III. National Health Survey -- IV. Review of industrial absenteeism -- V. Recent communications -- VI. Investigations of deaths

    "Deaths due to influenza and pneumonia for the 108 reporting cities of the United States showed a decrease 839 from the figure of 847 for last week. With the single exception of the Florida report of a community-wide epidemic of influenza-like disease (see Influenza Surveillance Report No. 36), which has not been confirmed as due to the Asian strain, we have no reports of epidemic influenza occurring on a large scale during the past two months. There is, however, increasing evidence that the Asian strain is still prevalent in many parts of the country. A number of confirmations from small outbreaks have been reported to this Unit recently. These are summarized in the current report. In addition, several dozen deaths following complications of confirmed Asian strain influenza have been reported to us since early February. It is apparent that school-age and young adult populations are not being significantly affected by influenza at this time. A review of industrial absenteeism in this report suggests that the susceptible industrial populations were exhausted in the fall. The same is true for the children of school-age. On the other hand, the susceptibles of the older population, relatively isolated from contact with the highly affected population groups of the fall, were apparently not exhausted by January. Deaths from influenza and pneumonia since January 1 have occurred predominantly among the oldest segments of the population." - p. 2

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files