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Youth suicide prevention programs : a resource guide
  • Published Date:
    September 1992
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF - 246.15 MB]


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Youth suicide prevention programs : a resource guide
Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (U.S.)
  • Description:
    1. Introduction and summary -- 2. School gatekeeper training -- 3. Community gatekeeper training -- 4. General suicide education -- 5. Screening programs -- 6. Peer support programs -- 7. Crisis centers and hotlines -- 8. Means restriction -- 9. Intervention afer a suicide -- Appendix A. Geographic listing of suicide prevention programs described -- Appendix B. Crosswalk of suicide prevention programs by strategy -- C. National sources of information on suicide.

    Given the continued high rates of suicide among adolescents and young adults (15-24 years of age), it is more urgent than ever that we apply our limited resources for prevention in the most effective manner possible. To that end, we developed this resource guide to describe the rationale and evidence for the effectiveness of various youth suicide prevention strategies and to identify model programs that incorporate these different strategies. The guide is for use by persons who are interested in developing or augmenting suicide prevention programs in their own communities. Because the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders is so widely accepted as a cornerstone of suicide prevention, we excluded from this guide programs that provide mental health services in traditional health service delivery settings. We did include, however, programs that were designed to increase referral to existing mental health services. We developed this resource guide through networking. Initially, 40 experts in youth suicide prevention around the country were asked to identify exemplary youth suicide prevention programs. Representatives from these programs were then contacted and asked to describe their activities and to identify other programs that they considered exemplary. The list was supplemented by contacting program representatives who participated in the 1990 national meeting of the American Association of Suicidology (AAS) and by soliciting program identification through Newslink, the newsletter of AAS. The resulting list of programs is not meant to represent all exemplary youth suicide prevention programs, but it does characterize the diversity of existing programs and can serve as a resource guide for those interested in learning about the types of prevention activities in the field.

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