Neglected parasitic infections in the United States : Chagas disease
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Neglected parasitic infections in the United States : Chagas disease

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  • English

  • Details:

    • Alternative Title:
      Chagas disease
    • Description:
      Chagas disease is a preventable infection caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and spread by infected insects called triatomine bugs. The initial infection usually does not cause severe symptoms and is often not even diagnosed. After years of chronic infection, some people develop heart diseases such as abnormal rhythms, heart failure, and an increased risk of sudden death. Chagas disease can also cause gastrointestinal problems, such as severe constipation and difficulty swallowing. Infection is typically spread by contact with the triatomine bug, most commonly found in rural parts of Mexico, Central America, or South America. However, the disease can also be transmitted from mother to baby (congenital), through organ transplant, or through blood transfusion. Chagas disease is considered a Neglected Parasitic Infection, one of a group of diseases that results in significant illness among those who are infected and is often poorly understood by health care providers.
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