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CDC health disparities and inequalities report--U.S. 2013
  • Published Date:
    November 22, 2013
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF - 3.71 MB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    Center for Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services (U.S.)
  • Series:
    MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report ; v. 62, suppl. no. 3
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    Foreword -- Introduction: CDC Health Disparities and Inequalities Report--United States, 2013 -- Social Determinants of Health -- Education and income--United States, 2009 and 2011 -- Access to healthier food retailers--United States, 2011 -- Unemployment--United States, 2006 and 2010 -- -- Environmental Hazards -- Nonfatal work-related injuries and illnesses--United States, 2010 -- Fatal work-related injuries--United States, 2005–2009 -- Residential proximity to major highways--United States, 2010 -- -- Health-Care Access and Preventive Services -- Colorectal cancer incidence and screening--United States, 2008 and 2010 -- Health insurance coverage--United States, 2008 and 2010 -- Seasonal influenza vaccination coverage--United States, 2009–10 and 2010–11 -- -- Behavioral Risk Factors -- Pregnancy and childbirth among females aged 10–19 years--United States, 2007–2010 -- Binge drinking--United States, 2011 -- Cigarette smoking--United States, 2006-2008 and 2009-2010 -- -- Health Outcomes: Morbidity -- Expected years of life free of chronic condition–induced activity limitations--United States, 1999–2008 -- Asthma attacks among persons with current asthma--United States, 2001–2010 -- Diabetes--United States, 2006 and 2010 -- Health-related quality of life--United States, 2006 and 2010 -- HIV infection--United States, 2008 and 2010 -- Obesity--United States, 1999–2010 -- Periodontitis among adults aged ≥30 years--United States, 2009–2010 -- Preterm births--United States, 2006 and 2010 -- Potentially preventable hospitalizations--United States, 2001–2009 -- Prevalence of hypertension and controlled hypertension--United States, 2007–2010 -- Tuberculosis--United States, 1993–2010 -- -- Health Outcomes: Mortality -- Coronary heart disease and stroke deaths--United States, 2009 -- Drug-induced deaths--United States, 1999–2010 -- Homicides--United States, 2007 and 2009 -- Infant deaths--United States, 2005–2008 -- Motor vehicle–related deaths--United States, 2005 and 2009 -- Suicides--United States, 2005–2009 -- Conclusion and future directions: CDC Health Disparities and Inequalities Report--United States, 2013.

    The MMWR series of publications is published by the Center for Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Atlanta, GA 30333.

    This supplement is the second CDC Health Disparities and Inequalities Report (CHDIR). The 2011 CHDIR was the first CDC report to assess disparities across a wide range of diseases, behavioral risk factors, environmental exposures, social determinants, and health-care access (CDC. CDC Health Disparities and Inequalities Report--United States, 2011. MMWR 2011;60[Suppl; January 14, 2011]). The 2013 CHDIR provides new data for 19 of the topics published in 2011 and 10 new topics. When data were available and suitable analyses were possible for the topic area, disparities were examined for population characteristics that included race and ethnicity, sex, sexual orientation, age, disability, socioeconomic status, and geographic location. The purpose of this supplement is to raise awareness of differences among groups regarding selected health outcomes and health determinants and to prompt actions to reduce disparities. The findings in this supplement can be used by practitioners in public health, academia and clinical medicine; the media; the general public; policymakers; program managers; and researchers to address disparities and help all persons in the United States live longer, healthier, and more productive lives.

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files