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Epidemiological data for murine typhus control activities.
  • Published Date:
    June 1945
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF - 10.73 MB]


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Epidemiological data for murine typhus control activities.
Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    United States. Office of Malaria Control in War Areas. Medical Division.
  • Description:
    Murine typhus fever is a disease of increasing public health importance. From figures reported to the U. S. Public Health Service the annual number of eases of typhus has increased nearly 1600% in the period from 1931 when 332 cases were reported to 1944 when 5258 eases were reported. Table I page 4 of the attached "Epidemiological Data for Murine Typhus Control Activities" illustrates three major points. 1. Typhus fever is increasing rapidly in number of cases being reported annually. 2. Typhus fever is being reported each year from additional areas which ha.ve not formerly reported cases. During the 7 year period from 1938 to 1944 the total number of counties in 9 States reporting typhus fever cases increased 52%. By years this increase was as follows: 1938-305, 1939-373, 1940-328, 1941-380, 1942-408, 1943-437, 1944-465. These figures are summarized in Table II page 5. 3. Typhus fever is a serious problem at present in the 9 States which report nearly all of the eases reported in the United States. While the reporting of cases has greatly increased, it is difficult to say what portion of increment is due to better reporting and what is due to an actual increase of the disease. Regardless of what has caused the increased number of reported cases typhus fever today presents a very important public health problem. In considering plans for intensifying and expanding typhus control activities, certain problems are encountered. Among these are (1) what areas are considered important enough to warrant control procedures and (2) what is the relative importance of the problem between the 9 States involved.

    Medical Division, Malaria Control in War Areas, U.S. Public Health Service, Atlanta, Georgia, June 1945.

    19 numbered pages

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