Welcome to CDC Stacks | Using Survey Data for Diabetes Surveillance Among Minority Populations: A Report of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Expert Panel Meeting - 19835 | Preventing Chronic Disease | CDC Public Access
Stacks Logo
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
Help
Clear All Simple Search
Advanced Search
Using Survey Data for Diabetes Surveillance Among Minority Populations: A Report of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Expert Panel Meeting
  • Published Date:
    Mar 15 2004
  • Source:
    Prev Chronic Dis. 2004; 1(2).
Filetype[PDF - 194.79 KB]


Details:
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    Introduction

    Data on diabetes morbidity and mortality and the quality of care among U.S. minority populations are necessary to assess progress toward eliminating racial/ethnic disparities and to design and implement effective interventions. This paper summarizes the discussions and recommendations of an expert panel to address the use of survey data for diabetes surveillance among minority populations.

    Methods

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Division of Diabetes Translation convened an expert panel of persons with survey experience and awareness of the problems in conducting health-related surveys among minority populations. Panel members were asked to 1) determine ways to enhance the ability of existing survey systems to address diabetes surveillance among minority populations; 2) identify survey systems that could be used to address surveillance needs; and 3) determine whether new minority-specific survey systems need to be developed.

    Results

    Panel members concluded that, although no existing survey system is completely adequate for diabetes surveillance among minority populations, new systems should not be developed. They recommended 1) investigating the use of community-based surveys; 2) exploring the ability of national surveys to increase sample sizes and produce state-level estimates; and 3) encouraging government agencies and public health programs to coordinate and integrate diabetes-related survey data and share analytic methodology.

    Conclusion

    No existing survey is suitable for conducting minority-specific diabetes surveillance. Modifying and expanding existing surveys to establish a diabetes surveillance system of sentinel minority populations would be more feasible than developing a new one. Interagency coordination and collaboration will be critical in this effort.