Criteria for a recommended standard : Occupational exposure to fibrous glass
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.

Search our Collections & Repository

All these words:

For very narrow results

This exact word or phrase:

When looking for a specific result

Any of these words:

Best used for discovery & interchangable words

None of these words:

Recommended to be used in conjunction with other fields

Language:

Dates

Publication Date Range:

to

Document Data

Title:

Document Type:

Library

Collection:

Series:

People

Author:

Help
Clear All

Add terms to the query box

Query box

Help
Clear All
i

Criteria for a recommended standard : Occupational exposure to fibrous glass

Filetype[PDF-2.52 MB]



Details:

  • Description:
    This report presents the criteria and the recommended standard based thereon which were prepared to meet the need for preventing impairment of health from acute and chronic effects of exposure to fibrous glass. The acute effects include skin, eye, and respiratory tract irritation. Chronic effects include bronchiolar impairment, fibrosis, and carcinogenesis. Concern is particularly strong in cases of occupational exposure to fibers less than 3.5 micrometers in diameter over long periods of time. However, the available data supports the conclusion that occupational exposure to fibrous glass has not resulted in the development of cancer. No cases of human cancer that can be directly linked to fibrous glass exposure have been found. Many gaps are present in the literature on the effects of fibrous glass on humans and animals. Studies concerned with possible carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, teratogenicity, and reproductive system effects are cited. Sampling tools and methods for environmental analysis are described." NIOSHTIC No. 00071263
  • Main Document Checksum:
  • File Type:

Supporting Files

  • No Additional Files

More +

You May Also Like

Checkout today's featured content at stacks.cdc.gov