Identifying emotional and behavioral problems in children aged 4-17 years; United States, 2001-2007
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Identifying emotional and behavioral problems in children aged 4-17 years; United States, 2001-2007

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  • Description:
    Objectives: This report examines two measures that identify children with emotional and behavioral problems: high scores based on questions in the brief version of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) and a single question about serious (definite or severe) overall emotional and behavioral difficulties. Children were classified into four groups, those with: only high scores on the brief SDQ, only serious overall difficulties, both high scores on the brief SDQ and serious overall difficulties, and neither high scores on brief SDQ nor serious overall difficulties. Children's characteristics, conditions, and service use in these four groups were compared. Methods: Data from the 2001-2007 National Health Interview Survey identified the emotional and behavioral problems, characteristics, conditions, and service use of children aged 4-17 years. Results: Approximately 7% of children had either high scores on the brief SDQ or serious overall difficulties, with 2% having only high scores on the brief SDQ, 3% having only serious overall difficulties, and 2% having both high scores on the brief SDQ and serious overall difficulties. Characteristics of the three groups of children identified with emotional and behavioral problems differed from each other and from children without problems. Children in each of the groups with emotional and behavioral problems, compared with children without problems, were more likely to have developmental conditions and to have used services. Additionally, children with serious overall difficulties (either with or without high scores on the brief SDQ) were more likely to have developmental conditions, receive special education, and use mental health services than children with only high scores on the brief SDQ..
  • Content Notes:
    by Patricia N. Pastor, Cynthia A. Reuben, and Catherine R. Duran. February 24, 2012. "CS229055." Includes bibliographical references (p. 11).
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