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Healthy People 2010; final review
  • Published Date:
    December 2012
Filetype[PDF - 296.02 MB]


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Healthy People 2010; final review
Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    National Center for Health Statistics (U.S.)
  • Series:
    DHHS publication ; no. (PHS) 2012-1038
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    Foreword -- Preface -- Acknowledgements -- List of tables and figures -- Health of the nation -- Healthy People 2010 overview -- Healthy People 2010 leading health indicators -- Reader’s guide -- Overview by focus area -- 1. Access to quality health services -- 2. Arthritis, osteoporosis, and chronic back conditions -- 3. Cancer -- 4. Chronic kidney disease -- 5. Diabetes -- 6. Disability and secondary conditions -- 7. Educational and community-based programs -- 8. Environmental health -- 9. Family planning -- 10. Food safety -- 11. Health communication -- 12. Heart disease and stroke -- 13. HIV -- 14. Immunization and infectious diseases -- 15. Injury and violence prevention -- 16. Maternal, infant, and child health -- 17. Medical product safety -- 18. Mental health and mental disorders -- 19. Nutrition and overweight -- 20. Occupational safety and health -- 21. Oral health -- 22. Physical activity and fitness -- 23. Public health infrastructure -- 24. Respiratory diseases -- 25. Sexually transmitted diseases -- 26. Substance abuse -- 27. Tobacco use -- 28. Vision and hearing -- Appendix A: Technical appendix -- Appendix B: Published issues of Healthy People statistical notes -- Appendix C: Healthy People 2010 lead agencies -- Appendix D: A Crosswalk between objectives from Healthy People 2010 to Healthy People 2020 -- Appendix E: Evolution of Healthy People

    In the third decade of the Healthy People initiative, Healthy People 2010 continued to provide a framework to improve the nation’s health by identifying overarching goals and objectives around which the public, private organizations, and citizens alike could unite. Like its predecessors, the Healthy People 2010 framework was structured for planning and action and to set priorities for policies and programs. Healthy People 2010 also advanced the methodology by which progress toward the objectives and the reduction of disparities would be measured for a better understanding of what has been achieved and where more attention and effort must be directed. The Healthy People 2010 Final Review provides analyzed data on 733 objectives—the total number of objectives with tracking data. The report shows that 23% of these objectives were met and another 48% were moving toward the Healthy People 2010 targets. In each of the Focus Areas, there were some objectives that moved toward, met, or exceeded their 2010 targets. For eight Focus Areas, more than 75% of the objectives with tracking data moved toward or achieved their targets. Further, there was substantial progress in the Heart Disease and Stroke Focus Area, for example, where the target of reducing cholesterol levels was met and progress continued on reducing smoking levels. I believe these results are reflected in the reduction in deaths from heart disease and stroke, the first and third leading causes of death in the United States. Progress in meeting other objectives supports the Healthy People 2010 overarching goal of increasing the quality and years of healthy life. Since the launch of Healthy People 2010, life expectancy at birth and at age 65 has increased for all U.S. population groups. But the core of Healthy People 2010 is to improve the quality of life, not only the length of life. The Healthy People development process recognized the complex interrelationship between health status and the prevalence and impact of disease and disability, and used innovative analytical techniques to define and measure quality of life. The ultimate goal is to make it possible for people to live the lives they want and to do the things they need to do for themselves, their families, and their communities. Progress in meeting other objectives supports the Healthy People 2010 overarching goal of increasing the quality and years of healthy life. Since the launch of Healthy People 2010, life expectancy at birth and at age 65 has increased for all U.S. population groups. But the core of Healthy People 2010 is to improve the quality of life, not only the length of life. The Healthy People development process recognized the complex interrelationship between health status and the prevalence and impact of disease and disability, and used innovative analytical techniques to define and measure quality of life. The ultimate goal is to make it possible for people to live the lives they want and to do the things they need to do for themselves, their families, and their communities. Despite the well-documented progress in many areas—as noted above, 71% of the evaluated objectives were either met or showed progress—the Healthy People 2010 Final Review points to areas where progress has been slow or where there is no real improvement to report. A prime example is the Nutrition and Overweight Focus Area. The Final Review reports that obesity rates increased across all age groups. For children aged 6–11 years, obesity rates rose 54.5%, whereas for adolescents aged 12–19 years, the obesity rate rose 63.6%. In addition, the proportion of adults who are obese rose 47.8%. Another area showing limited progress was the Arthritis, Osteoporosis, and Chronic Back Conditions Focus Area, where less than 25% of the targets were met. With respect to health disparities, Healthy People 2010 set a goal to eliminate health disparities identified by race and ethnicity, sex, education, income, geographic location, disability status, or sexual orientation. This goal eclipsed in ambition the Healthy People 2000 goal of reducing disparities. The Final Review reveals a significant lack of progress in reducing or eliminating health disparities. Over the past decade, health disparities increased for an estimated 13% of the objectives and not changed for approximately 80% of the objectives. An important achievement, however, was the development of more informative models and approaches to measuring disparities. Advances in the methodology may yet lead to better approaches in closing the health gaps. Another advance in the information foundation for Healthy People 2010 was the development of DATA2010, an interactive database system that compiles the monitoring data for tracking all the measurable objectives. Access to timely, accurate data is essential to the Healthy People process and to assessing and implementing Healthy People 2010 goals and objectives. Although much progress has been made developing and maintaining the data sources for Healthy People, some objectives were eliminated during Midcourse Review because of lack of data, and there were some objectives that could not be measured. Healthy People 2020 is already well underway. It builds on the strengths of Healthy People 2010 but expands its scope and outreach. Healthy People 2010 had 28 subject matter areas; Healthy People 2020 has 42. Healthy People 2010 had two overarching goals of increasing the quality of life and eliminating health disparities; the 2020 program has four, adding a focus on creating social and physical environments that promote good health and on emphasizing quality of life and good health behavior over the entire span of life. I expect the progress we saw in data sources and monitoring will be enhanced with new sources of data and with advances in information technology, new ways of making the objectives and data measuring progress even more relevant and usable to communities and individuals, as well as public and private organizations at the national, state, and local levels. From the first Healthy People, the focus has been on measurable objectives. We have seen progress, documented through the many data sources consistently and accurately. This information is crucial to guide officials, the public, and individuals in developing the policies and programs to improve the health of Americans.

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