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Essentials for childhood; steps to create safe, stable, and nurturing relationships
  • Published Date:
    1/3/13
Filetype[PDF - 16.31 MB]


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Essentials for childhood; steps to create safe, stable, and nurturing relationships
Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (U.S.), Division of Violence Prevention.
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    This document proposes strategies that communities ("communities" refers to any group with shared interests such as neighborhoods, counties, states, and professional groups) can consider to promote the types of relationships and environments that help children grow up to be healthy and productive citizens so that they, in turn, can build stronger and safer families and communities for their children. CM [child maltreatment] is a significant public health problem in the United States (U.S.) and around the world. Abused children often suffer physical injuries including cuts, bruises, burns, and broken bones. Physical injury is far from the only negative impact of maltreatment-it can also affect broader health outcomes, mental health, social development, and risk-taking behavior into adolescence and adulthood. CM includes all types of abuse and neglect of a child under the age of 18 by a parent, caregiver, or another person in a custodial role (e.g., clergy, coach, teacher) that results in harm, potential for harm, or threat of harm to a child. There are four common types of abuse: Physical abuse is the use of physical force, such as hitting, kicking, shaking, burning, or other shows of force against a child; Sexual abuse involves engaging a child in sexual acts. It includes behaviors such as fondling, penetration, and exposing a child to other sexual activities; Emotional abuse refers to behaviors that harm a child's self-worth or emotional well-being. Examples include name calling, shaming, rejection, withholding love, and threatening; Neglect is the failure to meet a child's basic physical and emotional needs. These needs include housing, food, clothing, education, and access to medical care.

    "1/3/13" - date from document properties

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