Cigarette Smoking Among US Adults With Selected Chronic Diseases Associated With Smoking, 2010–2019
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Cigarette Smoking Among US Adults With Selected Chronic Diseases Associated With Smoking, 2010–2019

Filetype[PDF-492.57 KB]


  • English

  • Details:

    • Alternative Title:
      Prev Chronic Dis
    • Description:
      Introduction

      People who smoke cigarettes are at greater risk of developing chronic diseases and related complications. Our study provides recent estimates and trends in cigarette smoking among people with respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, cancers, and diabetes.

      Methods

      Using data from the 2019 National Health Interview Survey, we calculated the prevalence of current and former cigarette smoking among adults aged 18 to 44 years, 45 to 64 years, and 65 years or older with chronic diseases. Those diseases were cancers associated with smoking, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, coronary heart disease, and/or stroke (N = 3,741). Using data from the 2010–2019 National Health Interview Surveys, we assessed trends in current cigarette smoking by chronic disease by using the National Cancer Institute’s Joinpoint Regression Program.

      Results

      In 2019, current cigarette smoking prevalence among adults with chronic diseases associated with smoking ranged from 6.0% among adults aged 65 or older with diabetes to 51.9% among adults aged 18 to 44 years with 2 or more chronic diseases. During 2010 through 2019, a significant decrease occurred in current cigarette smoking among adults aged 45 to 64 years with diabetes.

      Conclusion

      Overall, smoking prevalence remains high and relatively unchanged among people with chronic diseases associated with smoking, even as the overall prevalence of cigarette smoking in the US continues to decrease. The lack of progress in smoking cessation among adults with chronic diseases associated with smoking suggests that access, promotion, and integration of cessation treatment across the continuum of health care (ie, oncology, pulmonology, and cardiology settings) may be important in the success of smoking cessation in this population.

    • Pubmed ID:
      36173703
    • Pubmed Central ID:
      PMC9541675
    • Document Type:
    • Main Document Checksum:
    • File Type:

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