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Planning, implementing, and monitoring home-based HIV testing and counselling; a practical handbook for Sub-Saharan Africa
  • Published Date:
    2012
Filetype[PDF - 30.67 MB]


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Planning, implementing, and monitoring home-based HIV testing and counselling; a practical handbook for Sub-Saharan Africa
Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    World Health Organization, Dept. of HIV/AIDS. ; Centers for Disease and Prevention (U.S.) ; Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine ; ... More ▼
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    1. Background -- 1.1 Purpose of this practical handbook -- 1.2 Development of this handbook -- 1.3 Target audience -- 2. HBHTC delivery models -- 2.1 Door-to-door -- 2.2 Index-patient -- 2.3 Self-testing -- 3. Coordination at national level -- 3.1 Setting a national strategy for HBHTC -- 3.2 Coordination of partners conducting HBHTC -- 3.3 How organizations are authorized to conduct HBHTC -- 3.4 Human resources for HBHTC -- 3.5 Test kits to be used for HBHTC -- 4. Personnel -- 4.1 Programme structure and composition of a HBHTC team -- 4.2 Roles and responsibilities of different personnel in HBHTC -- 4.3 Recruitment and training of HBHTC service providers -- 4.4 Recruitment and training of community health workers/mobilizers -- 4.5 Staff retention -- 5. Programme planning -- 5.1 Choosing the location -- 5.2 Consulting stakeholders -- 5.3 Mapping of location -- 5.4 Determining availability of follow-up services -- 5.5 Planning return visits -- 5.6 Planning for data collection, protection, and storage -- 5.7 Supplies -- 5.8 Security and transport -- 5.9 Biosafety and waste disposal -- 6. Community and home entry -- 6.1 Community entry -- 6.2 Working with community health workers and/or mobilizers -- 6.3 Preparing the community -- 6.4 Home entry -- 7. Populations tested -- 7.1 Families -- 7.2 Couples and partners -- 7.3 Polygamous groups -- 7.4 Individuals -- 7.5 Child and adolescent testing -- 7.6 Disabled family members -- 7.7 Mental health disorders in the family -- 8. Protocol for HBHTC -- 8.1 Introducing the session -- 8.2 informed consent -- 8.3 Pre-test -- 8.4 Testing -- 8.5 Post-test and disclosure -- 9. Referral and linkages -- 9.1 Linkages to other services -- 9.2 Urgent referrals -- 9.3 Capacity at service-delivery points -- 9.4 Following up linkages and referrals -- 9.5 Understanding barriers to successful linkages -- 9.6 Strategies for improving successful linkages -- 10. Data, monitoring and evaluation -- 10.1 Types of data to collect -- 10.2 Programme indicators -- 10.3 Research data -- 10.4 Data collection methods -- 11. Quality assurance of HBHTC -- 11.1 Quality assurance for rapid HiV testing in HBHTC -- 11.2 Quality assurance for counselling -- 11.3 Involving the community in quality assurance -- 12. Special circumstances -- 12.1 Alcohol -- 12.2 Violence in the home -- 12.3 Sexual abuse -- 12.4 Key populations at higher risk of HIV exposure -- 13. Leaving an area -- 13.1 Determining when to move on -- 13.2 Returning results and following up linkages -- 13.3 Community feedback meetings -- 14. Useful resources.

    Home-based HIV testing and counselling (HBHTC) refers to HIV testing and counselling (HTC) services conducted by trained HTC service providers in someone's home. The main purpose of HBHTC is to bring HTC services to households, overcoming some of the barriers of access to testing services and providing testing to individuals who might not otherwise seek services. It has been_used successfully in rural and urban populations of sub-Saharan Africa with a high HIV prevalence and low coverage of HTC services. HBHTC provides services to individuals, couples, and family groups, and may be used to address specific populations (e.g. family members of known HIV-positive patients) and contribute to a family-based approach to HIV prevention and support. Using this approach can lead to decreased stigma in communities, help to diagnose individuals who are HIV-positive earlier, and potentially reach more couples than other HTC models. HBHTC has also led to increased follow-up for HIV-exposed infants.