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Preventing skin cancer; findings of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services on Reducing Exposure to Ultraviolet Light ; Counseling to prevent skin cancer : recommendations and rationale of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force
  • Published Date:
    October 17, 2003
  • Status:
    retired
Filetype[PDF-491.95 KB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    Task Force on Community Preventive Services on Reducing Exposure to Ultraviolet Light (U.S.) ; Task Force on Community Preventive Services (U.S.) ;
  • Description:
    Preventing skin cancer : findings of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services on Reducing Exposure to Ultraviolet Light / prepared by Mona Saraiya, Karen Glanz, Peter Briss, Phyllis Nichols, Cornelia White, Debjani Das -- Counseling to prevent skin cancer : recommendations and rationale of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

    Preventing skin cancer : findings of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services on Reducing Exposure to Ultraviolet Light. Rates of skin cancer, the most common cancer in the United States, are increasing. The most preventable risk factor for skin cancer is unprotected ultraviolet (UV) exposure. Seeking to identify effective approaches to reducing the incidence of skin cancer by improving individual and community efforts to reduce unprotected UV exposure, the Task Force on Community Preventive Services conducted systematic reviews of community interventions to reduce exposure to ultraviolet light and increase protective behaviors. The Task Force found sufficient evidence to recommend two interventions that are based on improvements in sun protective or "covering-up" behavior (wearing protective clothing including long-sleeved clothing or hats): educational and policy approaches in two settings--primary schools and recreational or tourism sites. They found insufficient evidence to determine the effectiveness of a range of other population-based interventions and recommended additional research in these areas: educational and policy approaches in child care centers, secondary schools and colleges, recreational or tourism sites for children, and workplaces; interventions conducted in health-care settings and targeted to both providers and children's parents or caregivers; media campaigns alone; and community wide multicomponent interventions. This report also presents additional information regarding the recommended community interventions, briefly describes how the reviews were conducted, provides resources for further information, and provides information that can help in applying the interventions locally. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force conducted a systematic review of counseling by primary care clinicians to prevent skin cancer (CDC. Counseling to prevent skin cancer: recommendation and rationale of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. MMWR 2003;52[No. RR-15]:13-17), which is also included in this issue, the first jointly released findings from the Task Force on Community Preventive Services and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

    Counseling to prevent skin cancer : recommendations and rationale of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. This statement summarizes the current U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on counseling to prevent skin cancer and the supporting scientific evidence, and updates the 1996 recommendation contained in the Guide to Clinical Preventive Services, Second Edition (U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Screening for skin cancer. In: Guide to clinical preventive services, 2nd ed. Washington DC: US Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 1996:141-52). The USPSTF finds insufficient evidence to recommend for or against routine counseling by primary care clinicians to prevent skin cancer. Although counseling parents may increase children's use of sunscreen, the USPSTF found little evidence to determine the effects of counseling on the sun protection behaviors of adults. These behaviors include wearing protective clothing, reducing excessive sun exposure, avoiding sun lamps and tanning beds, or practicing skin self-examination. The USPSTF, an independent panel of private sector experts in primary care and prevention, systematically reviews the evidence of effectiveness of a wide range of clinical preventive services, including screening tests, counseling, and chemoprevention. Members of the USPSTF represent the fields of family medicine, gerontology, obstetrics/gynecology, pediatrics, nursing, and prevention research.

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