Using self-determination theory to identify organizational interventions to support coal mineworkers’ dust-reducing practices
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Using self-determination theory to identify organizational interventions to support coal mineworkers’ dust-reducing practices

Filetype[PDF-495.82 KB]


  • English

  • Details:

    • Alternative Title:
      Int J Min Sci Technol
    • Personal Author:
    • Description:
      Advancing the application of safety and health (S&H) technologies is likely to remain a value in the mining industry. However, any information that technologies generate must be translated from the organization to the workforce in a targeted way to result in sustainable change. Using a case study approach with continuous personal dust monitors (CPDMs), this paper argues for an organizational focus on technology integration. Although CPDMs provide mineworkers with near real-time feedback about their respirable coal dust exposure, they do not ensure that workers or the organization will continuously use the information to learn about and reduce exposure sources. This study used self-determination theory (SDT) to help three mines manage and communicate about information learned from the CPDM technology. Specifically, 35 mineworkers participated in two mixed-method data collection efforts to discuss why they do or do not use CPDMs to engage in dust-reducing practices. Subsequently, the data was analyzed to better understand how organizations can improve the integration of technology through their management systems. Results indicate that using the CPDM to reduce sources of dust exposure is consistent with mineworkers' self-values to protect their health and not necessarily because of compliance to a manager or mine.
    • Pubmed ID:
      35924139
    • Pubmed Central ID:
      PMC9345595
    • Document Type:
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