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Expanding our understanding of the psychosocial work environment; a compendium of measures of discrimination, harassment and work-family issues
  • Published Date:
    December 2007
Filetype[PDF - 2.88 MB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health ; National Occupational Research Agenda ; NORA Special Populations at Risk Team ; ... More ▼
  • Series:
    DHHS publication ; no. (NIOSH) 2008-104
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    Introduction -- Summary of measures -- General diversity measures, diversity climate, multiple isms -- Race, racism, ethnicity, racial discrimination & related measures -- Sexism & sex discrimination -- Sexual harassment -- Work family/work-life measures -- Sexual orientation: heterosexism & homophobia

    "There is broad recognition that the psychosocial environment at work can affect physical and mental health as well as organizational outcomes such as work performance and effectiveness. This has been the focus of publications, recommendations and conferences developed by the NORA Organization of Work Team. Past research across several disciplines has revealed that gender- and race-related factors such as values, biases, harassment, discrimination, and lack of support for work-family balance can affect physical and mental health. However, these features of the work environment have rarely been included simultaneously with the study of other workplace conditions. Thus, knowledge is still very limited about correlations among them, as well as about potential confounding and interactions. This document is targeted to occupational safety and health researchers interested in evaluating the role of discrimination, bias and work-family issues in occupational injuries and illness. It will also be of interest to other health researchers interested in questions of the impact of workplace discrimination and bias on health. To develop this compendium, the researchers at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell, through a contract with NIOSH, scanned the formal literature broadly to identify and disseminate information on measures used by researchers to assess the following domains: 1. racism and racial/ethnic prejudice; 2. sexism and sexual harassment; 3. gender and racial discrimination; 4. work-family integration and balance; and, 6. support for diversity in the workplace/workforce." - NIOSHTIC-2

    "In 1996, NIOSH created the National Occupational Research Agenda to advance occupational safety and health research for the nation. This agenda encompassed 21 priority research areas, including Special Populations at Risk. This priority area was created in recognition of the fact that the nation's increasingly diverse workforce contains many women, older workers, and racial and ethnic minorities. Disparities in the burden of disease, disability, and death are experienced by these groups, due in part to their disproportionate employment in high hazard industries and to certain social, cultural and political factors. This document was developed by the investigators from the University of Massachusetts Lowell at the request of the Special Populations at Risk Team to fill that gap by disseminating to the broader occupational safety and health community a concise and accessible compendium of measures used by health researchers to assess the following domains: racism and racial/ethnic prejudice, sexism and sexual harassment, gender and racial discrimination, work-family integration and balance, support for diversity in the workplace/workforce." - p. iii

  • Supporting Files:
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