Differences in State Traumatic Brain Injury–Related Deaths, by Principal Mechanism of Injury, Intent, and Percentage of Population Living in Rural Areas — U.S. 2016–2018
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Differences in State Traumatic Brain Injury–Related Deaths, by Principal Mechanism of Injury, Intent, and Percentage of Population Living in Rural Areas — U.S. 2016–2018

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  • English

  • Details:

    • Alternative Title:
      MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
    • Description:
      Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) have contributed to approximately one million deaths in the U.S. over the last 2 decades (1). CDC analyzed National Vital Statistics System (U.S.) (NVSS) Mortality data for a 3-year period (2016-2018) to examine numbers and rates of TBI-related deaths, the percentage difference between each state's rate and the overall U.S. TBI-related death rate, leading causes of TBI, and the association between TBI and a state's level of rurality. During 2016-2018, a total of 181,227 TBI-related deaths (17.3 per 100,000 population per year) occurred in the U.S. The percentage difference between state TBI-related death rates and the overall U.S. rate during this period ranged from 46.2% below to 101.2% above the overall rate. By state, the lowest rate was in New Jersey (9.3 per 100,000 population per year); the states with the highest rates were Alaska (34.8), Wyoming (32.6), and Montana (29.5). States in the South and those with a higher proportion of residents living in rural areas had higher rates, whereas states in the Northeast and those with a lower proportion of residents living in rural areas had lower TBI-related death rates. In 43 states, suicide was the leading cause of TBI-related deaths; in other states, unintentional falls or unintentional motor vehicle crashes were responsible for the highest numbers and rates of TBI-related deaths. Consistent with previous studies (2), differences in TBI incidence and outcomes were observed across U.S. states; therefore, states can use these findings to develop and implement evidence-based Prevention strategies, based on their leading causes of TBI-related deaths. Expanding evidence-based Prevention strategies that address TBI-related deaths is warranted, especially among states with high rates due to suicide, unintentional falls, and motor vehicle crashes.
    • Pubmed ID:
      34648483
    • Pubmed Central ID:
      PMC8631284
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