Reported Preexposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Use Among Male Sex Partners of HIV-Positive Men—2016–2018
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Reported Preexposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Use Among Male Sex Partners of HIV-Positive Men—2016–2018

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    • Alternative Title:
      AIDS
    • Description:
      Objective: To estimate the proportion of U.S. HIV-positive men who report a male HIV-negative/unknown status (HIV-discordant) sexual partner taking PrEP, and the use of multiple HIV prevention strategies within partnerships. Design: The Medical Monitoring Project is a complex sample survey of U.S. adults with diagnosed HIV. Methods: We used data collected during June 2016—May 2018 among sexually-active HIV-positive men who had ≥1 HIV-discordant male partner (N=1,871) to estimate the weighted prevalence of reporting ≥1 partner taking PrEP. Among HIV-discordant partnerships (N=4,029), we estimated PrEP use, viral suppression among HIV-positive partners, and condomless anal sex. We evaluated significant (p<0.05) differences between groups using prevalence ratios with predicted marginal means. Results: Twenty-eight percent of sexually-active HIV-positive MSM reported ≥ 1 HIV-discordant male partner taking PrEP. Twenty percent of HIV-discordant partners were reported to be taking PrEP; 73% were taking PrEP or the HIV-positive partner was virally suppressed. PrEP use was lower among black and Hispanic partners compared with white partners (12% and 19% vs. 27%). Fewer black than white MSM were in partnerships in which PrEP was used or the HIV-positive partner had sustained viral suppression (69% vs. 77%). Condomless anal intercourse was more prevalent in partnerships involving PrEP use and in partnerships involving either PrEP use or sustained viral suppression among the HIV-positive partner. Conclusions: PrEP use was reported among 1 in 5 partners, with disparities between black and white partners. Increasing PrEP use and decreasing racial/ethnic disparities could reduce disparities in HIV incidence and help end the U.S. HIV epidemic.
    • Pubmed ID:
      32167972
    • Pubmed Central ID:
      PMC8594371
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