COVID-19 vaccine equity for racial and ethnic minority groups
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Up-to-Date Info: To find the latest CDC information on this topic go to: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/index.html

COVID-19 vaccine equity for racial and ethnic minority groups

  • Published Date:

    July 19, 2021

  • Language:
    English
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  • Description:
    Updated July 19, 2021 CDC is committed to COVID-19 vaccine equity, which is when everyone has fair and just access to COVID-19 vaccination. There are many social, geographic, political, economic, and environmental factors that create challenges to vaccination access and acceptance, and that often affect racial and ethnic minority groups. Some of these factors include: • Education, income, and wealth gaps • Job access and working conditions • Racism and other forms of discrimination • Gaps in healthcare access • Transportation and neighborhood conditions • Lack of trust as a result of past medical racism and experimentation Because of these and other challenges, some Black or African American people and Hispanic or Latino people are less likely to be vaccinated against COVID-19 than people in other racial and ethnic minority groups and non-Hispanic White people.[1-3] You can view the most current race and ethnicity data on COVID-19 vaccination. In addition to being less likely to get a vaccine, Black or African American people and Hispanic or Latino people are more likely to get seriously ill and die from COVID-19 due to the factors listed above.[4-6] CDC uses the Social Vulnerability Index (SVI) to assess the potential negative effects on communities caused by external stresses on human health. You can view the most current health equity data on COVID-19. Other racial and ethnic minority groups, including American Indian or Alaska Native people, have also been more severely affected by COVID-19 than non-Hispanic White people, due to the challenges listed above. However, vaccination rates among American Indian or Alaska Native people are the highest among racial and ethnic minority groups, [7] in part due to vaccination efforts from CDC and partners. You can find more information about CDC COVID-19 activities in Tribal communities, including vaccination efforts, and communication resources.
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