Seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 following the largest initial epidemic wave in the United States: Findings from New York City, May 13-July 21, 2020
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Seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 following the largest initial epidemic wave in the United States: Findings from New York City, May 13-July 21, 2020

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  • English

  • Details:

    • Alternative Title:
      J Infect Dis
    • Corporate Authors:
    • Description:
      Background

      New York City (NYC) was the U.S. epicenter of the Spring 2020 COVID-19 pandemic. We present seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infection and correlates of seropositivity immediately after the first wave.

      Methods

      From a serosurvey of adult NYC residents (May 13-July 21, 2020), we calculated the prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies stratified by participant demographics, symptom history, health status, and employment industry. We used multivariable regression models to assess associations between participant characteristics and seropositivity.

      Results

      Seroprevalence among 45,367 participants was 23.6% (95% CI, 23.2%-24.0%). High seroprevalence (>30%) was observed among Black and Hispanic individuals, people from high poverty neighborhoods, and people in health care or essential worker industry sectors. COVID-19 symptom history was associated with seropositivity (adjusted relative risk=2.76; 95% CI, 2.65-2.88). Other risk factors included sex, age, race/ethnicity, residential area, employment sector, working outside the home, contact with a COVID-19 case, obesity, and increasing numbers of household members.

      Conclusions

      Based on a large serosurvey in a single U.S. jurisdiction, we estimate that just under one-quarter of NYC adults were infected in the first few months of the COVID-19 epidemic. Given disparities in infection risk, effective interventions for at-risk groups are needed during ongoing transmission.

    • Pubmed ID:
      33836067
    • Pubmed Central ID:
      PMC8083309
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