COVID-19 vaccination coverage and intent among adults aged 18–39 years — United States, March–May 2021
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COVID-19 vaccination coverage and intent among adults aged 18–39 years — United States, March–May 2021

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      What is already known about this topic? Since April 19, 2021, all persons aged ≥16 years have been eligible for COVID-19 vaccination. Vaccination coverage and intent among adults are lowest among those aged 18–39 years. What is added by this report? Overall, 34% of adults aged 18–39 years reported having received a COVID-19 vaccine. Adults aged 18–24 years, as well as non-Hispanic Black adults and those with less education, no insurance, and lower household incomes, had the lowest reported vaccination coverage and intent to get vaccinated. Concerns about vaccine safety and effectiveness were commonly cited barriers to vaccination. What are the implications for public health practice? Addressing concerns about COVID-19 vaccine safety and efficacy and emphasizing the role of vaccination in protecting family and friends and resuming social activities might help increase coverage. Since April 19, 2021, all persons aged ≥16 years in the United States have been eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine. As of May 30, 2021, approximately one half of U.S. adults were fully vaccinated, with the lowest coverage and lowest reported intent to get vaccinated among young adults aged 18–39 years (1–4). To examine attitudes toward COVID-19 vaccination and vaccination intent among adults in this age group, CDC conducted nationally representative household panel surveys during March–May 2021. Among respondents aged 18–39 years, 34.0% reported having received a COVID-19 vaccine. A total of 51.8% were already vaccinated or definitely planned to get vaccinated, 23.2% reported that they probably were going to get vaccinated or were unsure about getting vaccinated, and 24.9% reported that they probably or definitely would not get vaccinated. Adults aged 18–24 years were least likely to report having received a COVID-19 vaccine and were most likely to report being unsure about getting vaccinated or that they were probably going to get vaccinated. Adults aged 18–39 years with lower incomes, with lower educational attainment, without health insurance, who were non-Hispanic Black, and who lived outside of metropolitan areas had the lowest reported vaccination coverage and intent to get vaccinated. Concerns about vaccine safety and effectiveness were the primary reported reasons for not getting vaccinated. Vaccination intent and acceptance among adults aged 18–39 years might be increased by improving confidence in vaccine safety and efficacy while emphasizing that vaccines are critical to prevent the spread of COVID-19 to friends and family and for resuming social activities (5). Suggested citation for this article: Baack BN, Abad N, Yankey D, et al. COVID-19 Vaccination Coverage and Intent Among Adults Aged 18–39 Years — United States, March–May 2021. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. ePub: 21 June 2021. mm7025e2.htm?s_cid=mm7025e2_w mm7025e2-H.pdf
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