Corrosion of friction rock stabilizers in selected uranium and copper mine waters
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Corrosion of friction rock stabilizers in selected uranium and copper mine waters

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      "The Bureau of Mines evaluated corrosion resistance of split set friction rock stabilizer mine roof bolts to aid in better prediction of useful service life. Electrochemical corrosion testing was conducted utilizing an automated corrosion measurement system. Natural and/or synthetic mine waters from four uranium and two copper mines were the test media for the two types of high-strength, low-alloy (HSLA) steels from which split set stabilizers are manufactured, and for galvanized steel. Tests were conducted with waters of minimum and maximum dissolved oxygen content at in-mine water temperatures. Retrieved split set stabilizers were also evaluated for property changes. Galvanized steel was found to be far superior to the unprotected steel in general corrosion resistance; limited tests indicate little tendency to pitting, contrary to behavior for the uncoated steel. Copper-bearing hsla steel was slightly more corrosion resistant than non-copper-bearing HSLA steel. Statistical analyses resulted in development of equations relating dissolved oxygen, chloride, sulfate, and magnesium contents of mine waters to corrosion rates of the two HSLA steel (nongalvanized). An equation was developed that relates corrosion rates of galvanized steel to mine water temperature and dissolved oxygen content." - NIOSHTIC-2 NIOSHTIC no. 10004139
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