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Summary Of Major Fire And Fire Injury Findings For All Coal Mining Categories; Analysis of Mine Fires for All US Underground and Surface Coal Mining Categories 1990-1999
  • Published Date:
    1/1/2004
Filetype[PDF - 426.87 KB]


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  • Description:
    The major fire and fire injury findings for all coal mining categories for 1990-1999 are reported in tables 37-38. Table 39 and figure 13 show the number of fires. fire injuries, risk rates, employees' working hours, and coal production (under- ground and surface coal mines only) by time period for all coal mining categories. Table 40 shows major findings (for under- ground coal mines only) for 1978-1992. For all coal mining categories, 458 fires occurred during 1990- 1999; 157 of those fires caused 164 injuries and 2 fatalities (Ewhr = 2,070 x l0%r, Irr = 0.016: C'P (for underground and surface coal mimes only) - 10,363 x l0\t, Frr = 0.044, LWD = 14,753). Twenty-nine fires and 17 injuries involved contractors. Sixty-six fires required firefighting interventions by mine rescue teams (25 times in underground mines) and fire brigades and fire departments (at least 41 times at surface coal operations). In all, 51 fires destroyed or heavily damaged equipment (including 16 pieces of mobile equipment) because of failure of other firefighting methods, late fire detection, undetected fires, or fire size. A total of 114 fires were detected late, and 42 fires were undetected. The greatest number of fires and fire injuries occurred at surface coal mines; the highest risk rate values were also calculated for this category. For all coal operations, the ignition sources that caused the greatest number of fires were flame cutting/welding spark/slag/flames (1 03 fires or 23% with 69 injuries), hydraulic fluid/fuel sprayed onto equipment hot surfaces (98 fires or 2 1 % with 29 injuries), spontaneous combustion/hot coal (62 fires or 14%), electrical short/arcing (49 fires or 11% with 18 injuries), and conveyor belt friction (3 1 fires or 7% with 6 injuries).

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