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Part Nine - Seismic Noise Characteristics - I. Summary; Survey Of Electromagnetic And Seismic Noise Related To Mine Rescue Communications - Volume II
  • Published Date:
    1/1/1974
Filetype[PDF - 1.03 MB]


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  • Personal Authors:
  • Description:
    Elementary concepts of seismic wave properties are reviewed to establish a framework for discussing seismic noise and its suppression. A liberal number of references is included for those who wish to pursue the topic in detail. A base motion noise level is established for a single surface seismometer. It is argued that simple array processing and seismometer burial should regularly permit us to approach this base noise level which is found in areas free of conspicuous man-made seismic noise sources. The sensitivity of the base seismic level to a number of common disturbances is presented. Solutions that promise to hold the "effective" seismic noise at a site near the base level are given for acoustic, meteorological and fixed local surface sources. Guidelines are suggested for controlling other local man-made sources, e.g. vehicular traffic, by keeping them at sufficiently large distances away from the seismometers to keep noise at permissible levels. These guidelines are speculative and conservative. They should be the subject of future study. The ability to process against general local activity, drilling, and intra- mine sources is limited. Certainly no dramatic gain is to be expected. When strong man-made and/or intramine noise sources are not controllable, detection may well be impossible to achieve, unless the seismometer can be moved close enough to the suspected miner position, i.e. via very deep holes, to compensate for the likely vast differences in strength of the miner signal and the uncontrollable man-made noise sources. However, many intramine sources, e.g., falling water, rock bursts, explosions, etc., may well preclude the existence of a hale miner in their vicinity, and therefore any need to attempt detection of a miner at such locations. The following recommendations are made to enhance the detection and location of a miner signaling seismically. They are: 1. Seismometer burial in slim holes. 2. Narrow band detection, using multiple narrow band filters to cover the likely signal band. 3. Broadband recording and analysis for time-of-arrival estimation.

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