Welcome to CDC Stacks | Part Seven - Theoretical Seismic Signal Source And Transmission Characteristics - I Summary; Survey Of Electromagnetic And Seismic Noise Related To Mine Rescue Communications - Volume II - 8854 | National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
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Part Seven - Theoretical Seismic Signal Source And Transmission Characteristics - I Summary; Survey Of Electromagnetic And Seismic Noise Related To Mine Rescue Communications - Volume II
  • Published Date:
    1/1/1974
Filetype[PDF - 859.52 KB]


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  • Description:
    The miner's seismic source strength can be approximately estimated on the basis of a single force acting in an infinite medium. Because of the uncertain- ty involved in estimating the amount of conversion from mechanical energy to seismic energy, the source strength thus estimated may be in error by as much as a half-order of magnitude. Calculations of wave transmission must take into account geometrical spreading, dissipation of energy by internal friction, and energy partition due to reflection and refraction of waves impinging on inter- faces in the layered earth. Theoretically derived peak-to-peak particle velocities in microinches per second (PIPS) are given for two models ; viz: (i) 50-feet thick and (ii) 100- feet thick 4000 ft/sec layers with Q = 20, overlying a half-space of 10,000 ft/sec material with Q = 5O;for the cases .of a hammer blow and a timber impact, at the frequencies of 50 Hz and 100 Hz. Comparison of the theoretically derived peak-to-peak particle velocity with experimental data taken at the Copper Queen Mine indicates that the theoretical particle velocity may be overestimated. A discussion of the distortion of seismic wavefronts by mine tunnels indicates that it is unfavorable to use a seismic source impact on the floor of the tunnel, since deceptive delays in arrival time are liable to occur at the surface. A program of parallel theoretical and experimental work is required to clarify uncertainties still associated with the nature and strength of the miner's seismic source signal which cannot be resolved within the approximations of this work. Its major components include theoretical investigations of the (1) Wave diffraction and scattering of an impact source on a face of a cylindrical cavity. (2) Impact of an elastic object on an elastic medium.

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