Welcome to CDC Stacks | Part Five - The Reference Event Method Of Seismic Location For Mine Rescue Systems - I. Summary; Survey Of Electromagnetic And Seismic Noise Related To Mine Rescue Communications - Volume II - 8852 | National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
Stacks Logo
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
Help
Clear All Simple Search
Advanced Search
Part Five - The Reference Event Method Of Seismic Location For Mine Rescue Systems - I. Summary; Survey Of Electromagnetic And Seismic Noise Related To Mine Rescue Communications - Volume II
  • Published Date:
    1/1/1974
Filetype[PDF - 559.26 KB]


Details:
  • Personal Authors:
  • Description:
    The location of trapped miners from their seismic signals will be in- accurate if we assume the P-wave propagation velocity is a constant. P- wave velocities are anything but constant in regions about mines, so some calibration is necessary to obtain more accurate seismic locations. The reference event method compares the time arrivals of signals generated by the miners with those previously recorded from a reference or calibration event in the vicinity of the miners. This method locates the miners' position relative to the calibration source. Hence, the location of the miners is absolute if the reference event position is known absolutely, usually from surveys and mine maps. Advantages resulting from the system, besides greater accuracy, are locations independent of the velocity model assumed, the same solution from the full array and from any subset of four or more seismometers in the array (three if the miners' depth is known), fewer seismometers required, and no complex computers required for analysis. VELA Uniform experience shows that the accuracy of locations of teleseismic explosions and earthquakes is improved by an order of magnitude over locations computed from average travel time curves. Each calibration event is applicable only over a limited range. We recommend a field test of the method at a mine to measure its location accuracy, the range of effectiveness for each calibration event, the number of seismometers needed, and the number of reference events required per mine. From these experiments we could decide whether the reference event method was useful and, if so, what form a practical rescue system would take.

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files