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Methane Control In Metal/Nonmetal Mines; Handbook For Methane Control In Mining
  • Published Date:
    6/1/2006
Filetype[PDF - 163.03 KB]


Details:
  • Description:
    In This Chapter [Gas reports from around the world Regulations for gassy mines in the United States Differences between metal/nonmetal mines and coal mines Monitoring for methane and taking action Diluting methane with additional ventilation Eliminating ignition sources What experienced mine operators say about methane control and Looking for methane when starting a new mine or expanding an existing mine] This chapter gives guidelines for preventing methane gas explosions during metal and nonmetal mine development and subsequent production operations.3 Emphasis is placed on recognizing the differences between coal mines, where the potential for methane hazards is relatively well understood, and metal/nonmetal mines, where methane may accumulate unexpectedly. Also, interviews with experienced mine operators add much to a complete understanding of what must be done to address methane problems in metal/nonmetal mines. METHANE GAS IN METAL/NONMETAL MINES Gas reports from around the world. The presence of methane gas in metal/nonmetal mines around the world is more common than one might imagine [Edwards and Durucan 1991]. For example: • The former Soviet republics have occurrences of methane and hydrogen in apatite, gold, and diamond ores, where solid or liquid bitumen occurs in the rock. • Scandinavian iron ore deposits include methane and other hydrocarbons in boreholes that intersect pitch and asphalt within the deposits, and methane and nitrogen in boreholes and fissures in arsenic and sulfide ores.

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