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An overview of the 1999 US Public Health Service/Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines for preventing opportunistic infections in human immunodeficiency virus-infected persons
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  • Corporate Authors:
    Infectious Diseases Society of America. ; United States. Public Health Service. ; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
  • Pubmed ID:
    10770912
  • Description:
    1999 US Public Health Service (USPHS)/Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) Guidelines for Preventing Opportunistic Infections (OIs) in Persons Infected with HIV, published in this issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases [1], provide disease-specific recommendations for the prevention of the most common serious OIs in HIV-infected persons in the United States [2]. This article synthesizes these recommendations and offers health care providers an organized approach for preventing OIs in patients infected with HIV. We recognize that preservation or reconstitution of immune function by instituting highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) can now provide the most potent protection against OIs in persons with advanced HIV disease, including many OIs for which specific prevention measures are not available [3, 4]. However, HAART is effective only for persons who have access to therapy, who are willing to accept therapy, who are able to adhere to it, and in whom viral suppression is achieved.

    This article is intended to guide the provider in prioritizing the various prevention measures available, including both HAART and specific OI prevention. As with the USPHS/IDSA guidelines [1], this article focuses on HIV-related care in the United States but should be applicable to other industrialized areas of the world.

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