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PHS Guidelines for Preventing Transmission of HIV through Transplantation of Human Tissue and Organs (1994)
  • Status:
    current
  • Source:
    MMWR. Recommendations and reports : Morbidity and mortality weekly report. Recommendations and reports / Centers for Disease Control. 1994; 43(RR-8):1-17.
Filetype[PDF - 225.32 KB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    CDC
  • Description:
    Although previous recommendations for preventing transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) through transplantation of human tissue and organs have markedly reduced the risk for this type of transmission, a case of HIV transmission from a screened, antibody-negative donor to several recipients raised questions about the need for additional federal oversight of transplantation of organs and tissues. A working group formed by the Public Health Service (PHS) in 1991 to address these issues concluded that further recommendations should be made to reduce the already low risk of HIV transmission by transplantation of organs and tissues. In revising these recommendations, the PHS sought assistance from public and private health professionals and representatives of transplant, public health, and other organizations. The revised guidelines address issues such as donor screening, testing, and exclusionary criteria; quarantine of tissue from living donors; inactivation or elimination of infectious organisms in organs and tissues before transplantation; timely detection, reporting, and tracking of potentially infected tissues, organs, and recipients; and recall of stored tissues from donors found after donation to have been infected. Factors considered in the development of these guidelines include differences between the screening of living and cadaveric donors; time constraints due to organ/tissue viability that may preclude performing certain screening procedures; differences in the risk of HIV transmission from various organs and tissues; differences between systems for procuring and distributing organs and tissues; the effect of screening practices on the limited availability of organs and some tissues; and the benefit of the transplant to the recipient.

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files