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Counseling on Sun Protection and Indoor Tanning
  • Published Date:
    Nov 10 2017
  • Source:
    Pediatrics. 140(6).
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF-421.74 KB]


Details:
  • Alternative Title:
    Pediatrics
  • Description:
    BACKGROUND

    The US Preventive Services Task Force recommends clinical counseling for individuals ages 10 to 24 years to decrease skin cancer risk.

    METHODS

    A national, random sample of US American Academy of Pediatrics members practicing primary care in 2002 (response rate 55%) and 2015 (response rate 43%). Surveys explored attitudes and experiences regarding sun protection counseling; indoor tanning questions were added in 2015. χ2 tests compared demographics and counseling responses across years, and multivariable logistic regression models examined counseling predictors.

    RESULTS

    More pediatricians in 2015 (34%) than in 2002 (23%) reported discussing sun protection during recent summer months with ≥75% of patients. This pattern held across all patient age groups (each P <.001). Female and suburban pediatricians counseled more; those in the South and West counseled less. More pediatricians in 2015 than in 2002 named time as a barrier. Sun protection ranked lowest among preventive topics in both years. In 2015, approximately one-third of pediatricians reported discussing indoor tanning at least once with 10 to 13 year-old patients; approximately half discussed this with older adolescents. Most (70%) did not know if their states had laws on minors’ indoor tanning access; those stating they knew whether a law existed counseled more.

    CONCLUSIONS

    Although improved, sun protection counseling rates remain low. Indoor tanning counseling can be improved. Because early-life exposure to UV radiation increases risk and clinician counseling can positively impact prevention behaviors, pediatricians have an important role in skin cancer prevention; counseling may save lives. Time constraints remain a barrier.

  • Pubmed ID:
    29127209
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC5892197
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