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First reports evaluating the effectiveness of stragegies for preventing violence; early childhood home visitation and firearms laws : findings from the Task Force on Community Preventive Services
  • Published Date:
    October 3, 2003
Filetype[PDF - 341.55 KB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    Task Force on Community Preventive Services (U.S.)
  • Description:
    First reports evaluating the effectiveness of strategies for preventing violence: early childhood home visitation / Robert A. Hahn, Oleg O. Bilukha, Alex Crosby, Mindy T. Fullilove, Akiva Liberman, Eve K. Moscicki, Susan Snyder, Farris Tuma, Amanda Schofield, Phaedra S. Corso, Peter Briss -- First reports evaluating the effectiveness of strategies for preventing violence : firearms laws / Robert A. Hahn, Oleg O. Bilukha, Alex Crosby, Mindy Thompson Fullilove, Akiva Liberman, Eve K. Moscicki, Susan Snyder, Farris Tuma, Peter Briss

    First reports evaluating the effectiveness of strategies for preventing violence : early childhood home visitation. Early childhood home visitation programs are those in which parents and children are visited in their home during the child's first 2 years of life by trained personnel who provide some combination of the following: information, support, or training regarding child health, development, and care. Home visitation has been used for a wide range of objectives, including improvement of the home environment, family development, and prevention of child behavior problems. The Task Force on Community Preventive Services (the Task Force) conducted a systematic review of scientific evidence concerning the effectiveness of early childhood home visitation for preventing several forms of violence: violence by the visited child against self or others; violence against the child (i.e., maltreatment [abuse or neglect]); other violence by the visited parent; and intimate partner violence. On the basis of strong evidence of effectiveness, the Task Force recommends early childhood home visitation for the prevention of child abuse and neglect. The Task Force found insufficient evidence to determine the effectiveness of early childhood home visitation in preventing violence by visited children, violence by visited parents (other than child abuse and neglect), or intimate partner violence in visited families. (Note that insufficient evidence to determine effectiveness should not be interpreted as evidence of ineffectiveness.) No studies of home visitation evaluated suicide as an outcome. This report provides additional information regarding the findings, briefly describes how the reviews were conducted, and provides information that can help in applying the recommended intervention locally.

    First reports evaluating the effectiveness of strategies for preventing violence : firearms. During 2000-2002, the Task Force on Community Preventive Services (the Task Force), an independent nonfederal task force, conducted a systematic review of scientific evidence regarding the effectiveness of firearms laws in preventing violence, including violent crimes, suicide, and unintentional injury. The following laws were evaluated: bans on specified firearms or ammunition, restrictions on firearm acquisition, waiting periods for firearm acquisition, firearm registration and licensing of firearm owners, "shall issue" concealed weapon carry laws, child access prevention laws, zero tolerance laws for firearms in schools, and combinations of firearms laws. The Task Force found insufficient evidence to determine the effectiveness of any of the firearms laws or combinations of laws reviewed on violent outcomes. (Note that insufficient evidence to determine effectiveness should not be interpreted as evidence of ineffectiveness.) This report briefly describes how the reviews were conducted, summarizes the Task Force findings, and provides information regarding needs for future research.

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