Chlamydia and Gonorrhea: Shifting Age-Based Positivity Among Young Females, 2010–2017
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
Help
Clear All

Chlamydia and Gonorrhea: Shifting Age-Based Positivity Among Young Females, 2010–2017

  • Published Date:

    August 20 2020

  • Source:
    Am J Prev Med. 59(5):697-703
  • Language:
    English


Public Access Version Available on: November 01, 2021, 12:00 AM information icon
Please check back on the date listed above.
Details:
  • Alternative Title:
    Am J Prev Med
  • Description:
    Introduction: This study aims to determine if and how the age distribution of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections in women evolved from 2010 to 2017, given changes in sexual practices over this time. Methods: All Chlamydia trachomatis/Neisseria gonorrhoeae co-testing laboratory results from females aged 12–30 years tested at Quest Diagnostics during 2010–2017 (n=17,794,680) were evaluated to assess trends in Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae positivity over time. Data were collected and analyzed in November 2018. Results: Age-based positivity shifted toward older ages from 2010 to 2017 for both Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. There was a declining trend in Chlamydia trachomatis positivity from 2010 to 2017 for the youngest age group (12–17 years; 17% decline, 8.9% to 7.4%, p<0.0001) but increasing trends for both those aged 18–24 years (21% increase, 6.1% to 7.4%, p<0.0001) and 25–30 years (50% increase, 2.2% to 3.3%, p<0.0001). The Chlamydia trachomatis positivity rate for 27-year-olds in 2017 (3.5%) and 24-year-olds in 2010 (3.5%) was the same. Similarly, there was a declining trend in Neisseria gonorrhoeae positivity from 2010 to 2017 for the youngest age group (12–17 years; 14% decline, 1.33% vs 1.17%, p<0.0001) but increasing trends for both those aged 18–24 years (27% increase, 0.79% vs 1.00%, p<0.0001) and 25–30 years (117% increase, 0.29% vs 0.63%, p<0.0001). For Neisseria gonorrhoeae, 30-year-old women tested in 2017 had an identical positivity rate to 23-year-old women tested in 2010, at 0.5%. Conclusions: Healthcare providers may want to consider this positivity rate age shift in Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae to inform prevention and control strategies, including considering the potential for increased risk in women aged 25–30 years.
  • Subject:
  • Pubmed ID:
    32828583
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC7903324
  • Document Type:
  • Collection(s):
  • Main Document Checksum:
  • File Type:
  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files
No Related Documents.

You May Also Like: